Tuesday
August, 16

Why Ethiopia Never Experienced Colonization

It’s amazing to learn that only Ethiopia and two other African nations have never experienced European colonization.

For many years, it was an independent empire, and even in the late 19th century, when several European nations fought for control of African regions, Ethiopia was exempt.

How could such a huge area remain uninhabited? especially one that was rich in resources that, in their possession, the Europeans would have greatly benefited from.

Ethiopia, formerly known as Abyssinia, is among the world’s oldest nations and is even mentioned several times in the bible. It dates back to 400 BCE. One thing to keep in mind is that Ethiopia’s distinct geographic location, economic sustainability, and population cohesion enabled the region to resist colonialization.

The leaders were adamant about preventing outside influence on their country despite resistance and numerous attempts to subdue them.

Ethiopia has defeated numerous international colonialist powers during its millennia of existence, most notably Italy in the middle of the 1890s.

To broaden its colonial sphere of influence in Africa, Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1895. At the Battle of Adwa on March 1, 1896, Ethiopian soldiers defeated Italian forces, ending the ensuing first Italo-Ethiopian War (1895–1896).

Because of their organization and camaraderie, their money, which allowed them to buy the modern rifles and ammunition they required to fight, and the astute decisions made by the Ethiopian emperor Menelik II, the Ethiopian troops were able to win the war.

About 200,000 troops, fully armed with both traditional and modern firearms, were gathered by the monarch. He made sure that the Italian forces had almost no chance of defeating him.

The Treaty of Addis Ababa, which put an end to the war and recognized Ethiopia as an independent nation, was signed on October 23rd, 1896, by Italy. Italy never established colonial power over Ethiopia, even though the country was later overrun during World War II.

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Uchara Faith
Faith is a valiant writer who has an undisputed passion for writing. She has worked with many highly reputable companies as content creator, radio presenter. She has a book to her name titled ECHO OF A DISTRESSED HEART. She's goal driven oriented person.

It’s amazing to learn that only Ethiopia and two other African nations have never experienced European colonization.

For many years, it was an independent empire, and even in the late 19th century, when several European nations fought for control of African regions, Ethiopia was exempt.

How could such a huge area remain uninhabited? especially one that was rich in resources that, in their possession, the Europeans would have greatly benefited from.

Ethiopia, formerly known as Abyssinia, is among the world’s oldest nations and is even mentioned several times in the bible. It dates back to 400 BCE. One thing to keep in mind is that Ethiopia’s distinct geographic location, economic sustainability, and population cohesion enabled the region to resist colonialization.

The leaders were adamant about preventing outside influence on their country despite resistance and numerous attempts to subdue them.

Ethiopia has defeated numerous international colonialist powers during its millennia of existence, most notably Italy in the middle of the 1890s.

To broaden its colonial sphere of influence in Africa, Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1895. At the Battle of Adwa on March 1, 1896, Ethiopian soldiers defeated Italian forces, ending the ensuing first Italo-Ethiopian War (1895–1896).

Because of their organization and camaraderie, their money, which allowed them to buy the modern rifles and ammunition they required to fight, and the astute decisions made by the Ethiopian emperor Menelik II, the Ethiopian troops were able to win the war.

About 200,000 troops, fully armed with both traditional and modern firearms, were gathered by the monarch. He made sure that the Italian forces had almost no chance of defeating him.

The Treaty of Addis Ababa, which put an end to the war and recognized Ethiopia as an independent nation, was signed on October 23rd, 1896, by Italy. Italy never established colonial power over Ethiopia, even though the country was later overrun during World War II.

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