Tuesday
August, 16

WHO To Increase Health Coverage In Nigeria

Dr. Francis Ukwuije, WHO’s Technical Officer on Health Financing, claims that the international organization’s mission in Nigeria will increase the country’s level of health coverage.

Ukraine made this statement during a meeting with Prof. Mohammed Sambo, Director-General of the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA), and the WHO Health Financing Mission in Nigeria on Tuesday in Abuja.

He pointed out that Nigeria has extraordinarily high out-of-pocket spending on healthcare—more than 70%.

According to Ukraine, more than 50% of the population nationwide, and up to 80% in some states, needed healthcare.

He claimed that the populace of Nigeria had become impoverished as a result of poor health or the cost of healthcare.

According to him, initiatives to bring about mandatory health insurance in Nigeria are just as crucial to the nation’s continued prosperity.

“I would want to clarify that it is part of WHO’s a responsibility to assist members in their priority areas.

“We can see that one of the accelerators that the country has selected is financing health insurance, as well as primary healthcare towards universal health coverage,” he stated.

He believes that the WHO’s mission to the NHIA is beneficial for several reasons, including the fact that it will first assist and energize the NHIA in its efforts to put the new law into practice and reap its benefits.

“Second, to make sure that we have strong advocacy and representation before the Nigerian government and those who draft the nation’s laws and policies.

To achieve universal health care, he added, the nation has “thirdly, to finally support the country in mopping up sectors of health financing.”

Speaking, Sambo said that the National Health Bill, which President Muhammadu Buhari had approved, was essential to the development of the country.

The National Health Insurance Authority Bill 2022, which replaces the National Health Insurance Scheme Act 2004, was signed into law by Buhari on May 21.

A trust fund will be established, according to the President, “to secure the coverage of 83 million impoverished Nigerians who cannot afford to pay premiums as suggested by the Lancet Nigeria Commission,” he added during the signing ceremony.

According to the director-general of NHIA, the President’s signature on the measure represented not only a significant commitment to realizing his vision for the next level agenda but also a determination to guarantee the provision of healthcare.

One of the essential components of progress, according to Sambo, is the population of Nigeria as a sign of art and health.

According to Sambo, the president’s recently updated measure serves as the country’s course and road map for obtaining healthcare services.

The remaining question, according to Sambo, is how health insurance agents will work with the government to promote the initiative by making sure that it not only materializes but also serves Nigeria’s populace to the fullest extent possible.

According to the director-general, the framework would improve the informal sector’s coverage and effectively recommend the covenant for the population’s most vulnerable group.

According to Sambo, “We need to make sure that this law would look to constitute roughly two million population which has allowed building what is called vulnerable efficiency activities.”

According to Sambo, the president’s recently updated measure serves as the country’s course and road map for obtaining healthcare services.

The remaining question, according to Sambo, is how health insurance agents will work with the government to promote the initiative by making sure that it not only materializes, but also serves Nigeria’s populace to the fullest extent possible.

According to the director-general, the framework would improve the informal sector’s coverage and effectively recommend the covenant for the population’s most vulnerable group.

According to Sambo, “We need to make sure that this law would look to constitute roughly two million population which has allowed building what is called vulnerable efficiency activities.”

Dr. Walter Molumbo, the WHO’s country representative in Nigeria, said the three-day meeting gave them a chance to talk with NHIA’s leadership and consider how to put the law that was just passed into effect into practice.

He claims that the WHO agrees that it is the appropriate course of action for Nigeria to take to achieve universal health care.

We have a great chance, and it is an honor for us to participate in this high-level lobbying meeting to discuss our operationalization strategy for the health insurance authority bill.

How can WHO help NHIA become stronger so it can fulfill its mandate?

To give the NHIA the best chance of advancing universal health care in Nigeria, we also want to take advantage of this opportunity to engage with as many stakeholders as we can.

Mulumba declared that the organization would take all the necessary steps to meet with top government officials and deliver their message.

“This is the right course of action, and we will work to support authority in that respect,” he said. “For financing in Nigeria, we need to refer to out-of-pocket expenditures in the country.

NAN

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Dr. Francis Ukwuije, WHO’s Technical Officer on Health Financing, claims that the international organization’s mission in Nigeria will increase the country’s level of health coverage.

Ukraine made this statement during a meeting with Prof. Mohammed Sambo, Director-General of the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA), and the WHO Health Financing Mission in Nigeria on Tuesday in Abuja.

He pointed out that Nigeria has extraordinarily high out-of-pocket spending on healthcare—more than 70%.

According to Ukraine, more than 50% of the population nationwide, and up to 80% in some states, needed healthcare.

He claimed that the populace of Nigeria had become impoverished as a result of poor health or the cost of healthcare.

According to him, initiatives to bring about mandatory health insurance in Nigeria are just as crucial to the nation’s continued prosperity.

“I would want to clarify that it is part of WHO’s a responsibility to assist members in their priority areas.

“We can see that one of the accelerators that the country has selected is financing health insurance, as well as primary healthcare towards universal health coverage,” he stated.

He believes that the WHO’s mission to the NHIA is beneficial for several reasons, including the fact that it will first assist and energize the NHIA in its efforts to put the new law into practice and reap its benefits.

“Second, to make sure that we have strong advocacy and representation before the Nigerian government and those who draft the nation’s laws and policies.

To achieve universal health care, he added, the nation has “thirdly, to finally support the country in mopping up sectors of health financing.”

Speaking, Sambo said that the National Health Bill, which President Muhammadu Buhari had approved, was essential to the development of the country.

The National Health Insurance Authority Bill 2022, which replaces the National Health Insurance Scheme Act 2004, was signed into law by Buhari on May 21.

A trust fund will be established, according to the President, “to secure the coverage of 83 million impoverished Nigerians who cannot afford to pay premiums as suggested by the Lancet Nigeria Commission,” he added during the signing ceremony.

According to the director-general of NHIA, the President’s signature on the measure represented not only a significant commitment to realizing his vision for the next level agenda but also a determination to guarantee the provision of healthcare.

One of the essential components of progress, according to Sambo, is the population of Nigeria as a sign of art and health.

According to Sambo, the president’s recently updated measure serves as the country’s course and road map for obtaining healthcare services.

The remaining question, according to Sambo, is how health insurance agents will work with the government to promote the initiative by making sure that it not only materializes but also serves Nigeria’s populace to the fullest extent possible.

According to the director-general, the framework would improve the informal sector’s coverage and effectively recommend the covenant for the population’s most vulnerable group.

According to Sambo, “We need to make sure that this law would look to constitute roughly two million population which has allowed building what is called vulnerable efficiency activities.”

According to Sambo, the president’s recently updated measure serves as the country’s course and road map for obtaining healthcare services.

The remaining question, according to Sambo, is how health insurance agents will work with the government to promote the initiative by making sure that it not only materializes, but also serves Nigeria’s populace to the fullest extent possible.

According to the director-general, the framework would improve the informal sector’s coverage and effectively recommend the covenant for the population’s most vulnerable group.

According to Sambo, “We need to make sure that this law would look to constitute roughly two million population which has allowed building what is called vulnerable efficiency activities.”

Dr. Walter Molumbo, the WHO’s country representative in Nigeria, said the three-day meeting gave them a chance to talk with NHIA’s leadership and consider how to put the law that was just passed into effect into practice.

He claims that the WHO agrees that it is the appropriate course of action for Nigeria to take to achieve universal health care.

We have a great chance, and it is an honor for us to participate in this high-level lobbying meeting to discuss our operationalization strategy for the health insurance authority bill.

How can WHO help NHIA become stronger so it can fulfill its mandate?

To give the NHIA the best chance of advancing universal health care in Nigeria, we also want to take advantage of this opportunity to engage with as many stakeholders as we can.

Mulumba declared that the organization would take all the necessary steps to meet with top government officials and deliver their message.

“This is the right course of action, and we will work to support authority in that respect,” he said. “For financing in Nigeria, we need to refer to out-of-pocket expenditures in the country.

NAN

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