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Tunisian Interior Ministry Says There’s A Plot To Kill President

Concerned about a deepening political crisis, Tunisia’s security authorities said on Friday that they had discovered plots to kill President Kais Saied.

The threats came to light when an assailant who had been previously imprisoned on terrorism-related offences and freed in 2021 attempted to knife two police officers who were manning a synagogue in Tunis’s main square.

“According to credible information and investigations still underway, the president of the republic and the presidency as an institution are the target of serious threats,” Interior Ministry spokeswoman Fadhila Khelifi said.

“There is a plan by groups both at home and abroad to target the security of the president” and to “damage state security and create chaos,” she said.

A knife-wielding attacker in Tunis attacked police stationed to defend the Grand Synagogue in the heart of the city, injuring two officers before being subdued. The ministry declared that an inquiry was ongoing.

Over 100,000 Jews lived in Tunisia before the country gained its independence from France in 1956, but emigration has reduced their population to only 1,000.

READ MORE: Jordan’s King Calls For Middle East Military Alliance Similar To NATO

Numerous Islamist assaults in Tunisia have resulted in the deaths of scores of people since the so-called “Arab Spring” revolution that toppled dictator Zine El-Abidine ben Ali in 2011.

Nearly a year after Saied took total authority in July 2021, the most recent attack comes amid a severe economic and political crisis. The president’s detractors charge him with staging a coup since he rules by decree and is crafting a new constitution that he intends to put to a vote next month.

As practically all major political parties and the influential labor union have come out against Saied’s intentions and held street rallies against him in recent months, opposition to him has grown.

There hasn’t been a significant crackdown on the opposition, despite the president’s detractors’ claims that his actions have cast doubt on the rights and liberties secured in the 2011 revolution.

According to Saied, his actions are lawful and necessary to prevent Tunisia from succumbing to years of political stalemate, economic stagnation, and the negative impact of Islamist organizations.

A well-known left-wing politician and Saied rival, Ahmed Nejib Chebbi, challenged the veracity of the president’s assassination plot allegations.

“This is just to justify new arrests and to take revenge against his rivals,” Chebbi said. “The president is politically isolated and is trying to stir up public sympathy.”

Before Saied came to power, Ennahdha, an Islamist party, controlled Tunisian politics. Ennahdha dismissed the threats as “theater.”

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Concerned about a deepening political crisis, Tunisia’s security authorities said on Friday that they had discovered plots to kill President Kais Saied.

The threats came to light when an assailant who had been previously imprisoned on terrorism-related offences and freed in 2021 attempted to knife two police officers who were manning a synagogue in Tunis’s main square.

“According to credible information and investigations still underway, the president of the republic and the presidency as an institution are the target of serious threats,” Interior Ministry spokeswoman Fadhila Khelifi said.

“There is a plan by groups both at home and abroad to target the security of the president” and to “damage state security and create chaos,” she said.

A knife-wielding attacker in Tunis attacked police stationed to defend the Grand Synagogue in the heart of the city, injuring two officers before being subdued. The ministry declared that an inquiry was ongoing.

Over 100,000 Jews lived in Tunisia before the country gained its independence from France in 1956, but emigration has reduced their population to only 1,000.

READ MORE: Jordan’s King Calls For Middle East Military Alliance Similar To NATO

Numerous Islamist assaults in Tunisia have resulted in the deaths of scores of people since the so-called “Arab Spring” revolution that toppled dictator Zine El-Abidine ben Ali in 2011.

Nearly a year after Saied took total authority in July 2021, the most recent attack comes amid a severe economic and political crisis. The president’s detractors charge him with staging a coup since he rules by decree and is crafting a new constitution that he intends to put to a vote next month.

As practically all major political parties and the influential labor union have come out against Saied’s intentions and held street rallies against him in recent months, opposition to him has grown.

There hasn’t been a significant crackdown on the opposition, despite the president’s detractors’ claims that his actions have cast doubt on the rights and liberties secured in the 2011 revolution.

According to Saied, his actions are lawful and necessary to prevent Tunisia from succumbing to years of political stalemate, economic stagnation, and the negative impact of Islamist organizations.

A well-known left-wing politician and Saied rival, Ahmed Nejib Chebbi, challenged the veracity of the president’s assassination plot allegations.

“This is just to justify new arrests and to take revenge against his rivals,” Chebbi said. “The president is politically isolated and is trying to stir up public sympathy.”

Before Saied came to power, Ennahdha, an Islamist party, controlled Tunisian politics. Ennahdha dismissed the threats as “theater.”

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