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Taiwan Practices Resisting Chinese Sea Invasion In War Games

Tuesday’s annual war games in Taiwan included simulations of Chinese strikes from the sea, and President Tsai Ing-wen, who was watching from atop a vessel, praised the military’s “determination.”

China, which sees the autonomous island as a part of its territory that may be taken by force if necessary, constantly threatens to invade democratic Taiwan.

Tsai, dressed in military fatigues, boarded the Kee Lung class destroyer on the second day of the island’s largest annual war drills to oversee a live-fire exercise off Taiwan’s eastern coast.

The military claimed that fighter jets and warships launched multiple missile types in an effort to intercept “a group of enemy ships.”

A Dutch-built Sword Dragon class submarine practiced an emergency ascent while anti-submarine rockets and depth bombs were also launched, it claimed.

READ MORE: Tunisia Referendum: President Saied Celebrates Expected Win

“The precise and solid exercise carried out by everyone just then demonstrates the capabilities and determination of the Republic of China’s military to protect our home and defend our country,” Tsai said in a message broadcast to the ship, using Taiwan’s formal name.

Since Tsai entered office in 2016, Beijing has become much more belligerent because she disagrees with its position that the island belongs to China.

Fears of a Chinese invasion of the island have increased as a result of this year’s five-day “Han Kuang” (Han Glory) military games, which included lessons from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Bill Burns, the director of the CIA, said last week that Beijing appeared ready-to-use force in Taiwan and that its planning for an invasion was influenced by Russia’s experience in Ukraine.

Beijing insists that the Taiwan Strait, a short waterway separating the island from the mainland, is not international territory. As a result, tensions between the two sides frequently flare up there.

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Adoga Stephen
Adoga Stephen is a trained journalist, researcher, creative writer and freelancer. He studied Mass Communication at the Lagos State University of Science and Technology (then Laspotech) and acquired requisite skills for the practice of journalism, a profession he has been practicing since 2016.

Tuesday’s annual war games in Taiwan included simulations of Chinese strikes from the sea, and President Tsai Ing-wen, who was watching from atop a vessel, praised the military’s “determination.”

China, which sees the autonomous island as a part of its territory that may be taken by force if necessary, constantly threatens to invade democratic Taiwan.

Tsai, dressed in military fatigues, boarded the Kee Lung class destroyer on the second day of the island’s largest annual war drills to oversee a live-fire exercise off Taiwan’s eastern coast.

The military claimed that fighter jets and warships launched multiple missile types in an effort to intercept “a group of enemy ships.”

A Dutch-built Sword Dragon class submarine practiced an emergency ascent while anti-submarine rockets and depth bombs were also launched, it claimed.

READ MORE: Tunisia Referendum: President Saied Celebrates Expected Win

“The precise and solid exercise carried out by everyone just then demonstrates the capabilities and determination of the Republic of China’s military to protect our home and defend our country,” Tsai said in a message broadcast to the ship, using Taiwan’s formal name.

Since Tsai entered office in 2016, Beijing has become much more belligerent because she disagrees with its position that the island belongs to China.

Fears of a Chinese invasion of the island have increased as a result of this year’s five-day “Han Kuang” (Han Glory) military games, which included lessons from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Bill Burns, the director of the CIA, said last week that Beijing appeared ready-to-use force in Taiwan and that its planning for an invasion was influenced by Russia’s experience in Ukraine.

Beijing insists that the Taiwan Strait, a short waterway separating the island from the mainland, is not international territory. As a result, tensions between the two sides frequently flare up there.

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