Friday
August, 19

Singapore Extends Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s Visa

The former president of Sri Lanka, Gotabaya Rajapaksa, has been granted a short-stay visa by Singapore, local media in the city-state reported on Wednesday.

Rajapaksa left his country on July 13 after thousands of demonstrators who had been demonstrating against the island nation’s terrible economic plight attacked his official house.

He first made his getaway in a military plane to the Maldives before continuing on to Singapore, where he has been residing since July 14 on a short-term visit pass.

The Straits Times newspaper said on Wednesday that Rajapaksa’s 14-day visit pass has been extended, enabling him to remain until August 11. The source was not named.

READ MORE: Earthquake Kills At Least 4, Injures Dozens In Philippines

Requests for comment from Singapore’s Immigration and Checkpoints Authority were not immediately fulfilled.

Authorities had earlier stated that the former president did not request refuge but was nonetheless permitted to enter Singapore on a “private visit.”

Rajapaksa is not hiding and is anticipated to return to his nation, according to Sri Lanka’s cabinet spokesperson Bandula Gunawardena, who also noted that the administration has not been aware of his travel intentions.

“He is not in hiding and my understanding is that he will return, but if there is anything to the contrary, the state authorities will inform him and ensure that there is no danger for the ex-president,” he said.

The island nation defaulted on its $51 billion debt and was unable to import even the most basic needs, according to protesters, who blamed Rajapaksa’s government for mismanaging the country’s economy.

The 22 million-person nation has seen the worst economic downturn since obtaining independence, with months-long blackouts, severe food and fuel shortages, and soaring prices.

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Adoga Stephen
Adoga Stephen is a trained journalist, researcher, creative writer and freelancer. He studied Mass Communication at the Lagos State University of Science and Technology (then Laspotech) and acquired requisite skills for the practice of journalism, a profession he has been practicing since 2016.

The former president of Sri Lanka, Gotabaya Rajapaksa, has been granted a short-stay visa by Singapore, local media in the city-state reported on Wednesday.

Rajapaksa left his country on July 13 after thousands of demonstrators who had been demonstrating against the island nation’s terrible economic plight attacked his official house.

He first made his getaway in a military plane to the Maldives before continuing on to Singapore, where he has been residing since July 14 on a short-term visit pass.

The Straits Times newspaper said on Wednesday that Rajapaksa’s 14-day visit pass has been extended, enabling him to remain until August 11. The source was not named.

READ MORE: Earthquake Kills At Least 4, Injures Dozens In Philippines

Requests for comment from Singapore’s Immigration and Checkpoints Authority were not immediately fulfilled.

Authorities had earlier stated that the former president did not request refuge but was nonetheless permitted to enter Singapore on a “private visit.”

Rajapaksa is not hiding and is anticipated to return to his nation, according to Sri Lanka’s cabinet spokesperson Bandula Gunawardena, who also noted that the administration has not been aware of his travel intentions.

“He is not in hiding and my understanding is that he will return, but if there is anything to the contrary, the state authorities will inform him and ensure that there is no danger for the ex-president,” he said.

The island nation defaulted on its $51 billion debt and was unable to import even the most basic needs, according to protesters, who blamed Rajapaksa’s government for mismanaging the country’s economy.

The 22 million-person nation has seen the worst economic downturn since obtaining independence, with months-long blackouts, severe food and fuel shortages, and soaring prices.

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