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Over 30 Govts Discuss Hezbollah’s ‘Ongoing Global Terrorist’ Plots

The State Department reported on Friday that a group of more than 30 states met this week to talk about the threat that Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed terrorist organization, poses to the world.

“Participants discussed Hezbollah’s ongoing global terrorist plotting, weapons procurement, and financial schemes, and outlined how Hezbollah may adapt in the future to evade law enforcement detection,” according to a statement.

The Law Enforcement Coordination Group (LECG) also looked at ways to disrupt “Hezbollah terrorist and criminal activities, and associated networks.”

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“LECG participants noted that these actions demonstrate the growing recognition among our partners about the need to cooperate on our efforts to counter Hezbollah’s global terrorist networks,” the statement read.

The Middle East, South America, Central America, Africa, the Indo-Pacific, and North America were represented at this, the group’s eighth meeting. The State Department did not say where the meeting was held in Europe, although Europol was there as well.

Hezbollah has been labeled a terrorist organization by other nations in recent years, following Washington’s lead.

Some nations have prohibited or placed restrictions on Hezbollah’s activities, including taking part in pro-Hezbollah parades.

In 1997, the US classified the group as a whole as a terrorist organization. International efforts to put pressure on Hezbollah and convince them to disarm have been hampered by France’s refusal to completely blacklist the organization. Following the Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990), they were the only organization permitted to retain their weapons.

Israel, which continues to control a few isolated areas of Lebanese territory, including the Shebaa Farms and the northern portion of Ghajar, is the target of Hezbollah’s assertions that it is a resistance movement.

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The State Department reported on Friday that a group of more than 30 states met this week to talk about the threat that Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed terrorist organization, poses to the world.

“Participants discussed Hezbollah’s ongoing global terrorist plotting, weapons procurement, and financial schemes, and outlined how Hezbollah may adapt in the future to evade law enforcement detection,” according to a statement.

The Law Enforcement Coordination Group (LECG) also looked at ways to disrupt “Hezbollah terrorist and criminal activities, and associated networks.”

READ MORE: World War III ‘Started On Feb. 24:’ Ukraine Defense Minister Reznikov

“LECG participants noted that these actions demonstrate the growing recognition among our partners about the need to cooperate on our efforts to counter Hezbollah’s global terrorist networks,” the statement read.

The Middle East, South America, Central America, Africa, the Indo-Pacific, and North America were represented at this, the group’s eighth meeting. The State Department did not say where the meeting was held in Europe, although Europol was there as well.

Hezbollah has been labeled a terrorist organization by other nations in recent years, following Washington’s lead.

Some nations have prohibited or placed restrictions on Hezbollah’s activities, including taking part in pro-Hezbollah parades.

In 1997, the US classified the group as a whole as a terrorist organization. International efforts to put pressure on Hezbollah and convince them to disarm have been hampered by France’s refusal to completely blacklist the organization. Following the Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990), they were the only organization permitted to retain their weapons.

Israel, which continues to control a few isolated areas of Lebanese territory, including the Shebaa Farms and the northern portion of Ghajar, is the target of Hezbollah’s assertions that it is a resistance movement.

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