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Fuel Reaches N250/Litre In Abuja, Others

As lines for the product spread to further states, some filling stations in Lagos, Abuja, Niger, and other states on Sunday sold Premium Motor Spirit for between N200 and N250 per litre, higher than the government-approved retail price of N165 per litre.

It was believed that the Nigerian National Petroleum Company’s inadequate supply of goods was to blame for the growing gasoline lines in Lagos and neighboring states, as well as their protracted persistence in Abuja and vicinity.

Since a number of years, only NNPC has imported gasoline into Nigeria. It frequently makes the assertion that it has enough items to keep the nation moist for months. On Sunday, though, when contacted, it remained silent.

As black marketers were dispensing the fuel for N300 per litre, our journalists learned that certain filling stations in Lagos offered gasoline to drivers for N200 per litre while there were still lines outside.

On Sunday, the Khalif filling station in Kubwa, Abuja, sold the product for N250 per litre, despite having N165 per litre advertised on its pumps. However, the amount will be computed based on N250/litre once the driver informs the fuel attendant of the quantity they desire to purchase.

Since February of this year, the lines for gasoline in Abuja have never stopped, but on Sunday, they got worse in the neighboring states of Nasarawa and Niger as drivers looked for PMS to travel during the Sallah break.

Oil merchants refuted accusations of product hoarding or diversion, pointing out that the main causes of the shortage were the NNPC’s inadequate supply of PMS and the failure to pay for bridging claims for the transportation of gasoline.

According to Billy Gillis-Harry, president of the Nigerian Association of Petroleum Products Retail Outlets, filling stations that had fuel to sell were operating while those that were closed were unable to do so.

He said, “The problem is that every side needs to be transparent. We, as retail outlet owners, are ready to sell petroleum products to the teeming Nigerian public. We have no reason why we should not sell our products.

“The money used in buying the 45,000 litres of petrol from depots, almost N7m, is borrowed, and time-bound. So every retail outlet owner knows that the wise thing to do in this business is to sell out and try to turn around that sale as many times as possible.

“So with this scenario in view, there is no retail outlet owner that is hoarding product or diverting it. Yes, we know there may be bad eggs among the good bunch, but the fact that we are not having sufficient products is what has remained the cause of fuel scarcity.”

Gillis- Harry added, “In the case of Abuja, it is clear to understand that if the bridging claims are paid to marketers, they will be able to continue their products’ purchase cycle. That is just the reality. So payment of bridging claims is an issue and insufficient supply is also another issue.

READ MORE: 2023 May Be Nigeria’s Costliest Elections Ever – Rewane

“This is because if there is product and there is money for us to buy, then why won’t we buy and sell? What else are we in business for? Are we going to buy products and keep them? The answer is no! So this is the reality.”

The president of PETROAN said that the necessity to scrap the current gasoline subsidy system was still the only thing that could resolve the issue in the downstream oil industry.

He said, “There is a solution, and it is simple. The subsidy that is being paid should be stopped. The money should be channeled to other developmental infrastructures such as health, education, etc.

“And since the refineries have not been fixed by the government, they should either give it wholly to private sector practitioners like PETROAN that own the retail outlets to manage.”

When questioned about the national oil company’s allegations of an inadequate supply of gasoline, the NNPC remained silent. Garba-Deen Mohammad, its spokesman, did not return calls and has not yet replied to a text message regarding the situation.

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Adoga Stephen
Adoga Stephen is a trained journalist, researcher, creative writer and freelancer. He studied Mass Communication at the Lagos State University of Science and Technology (then Laspotech) and acquired requisite skills for the practice of journalism, a profession he has been practicing since 2016.

As lines for the product spread to further states, some filling stations in Lagos, Abuja, Niger, and other states on Sunday sold Premium Motor Spirit for between N200 and N250 per litre, higher than the government-approved retail price of N165 per litre.

It was believed that the Nigerian National Petroleum Company’s inadequate supply of goods was to blame for the growing gasoline lines in Lagos and neighboring states, as well as their protracted persistence in Abuja and vicinity.

Since a number of years, only NNPC has imported gasoline into Nigeria. It frequently makes the assertion that it has enough items to keep the nation moist for months. On Sunday, though, when contacted, it remained silent.

As black marketers were dispensing the fuel for N300 per litre, our journalists learned that certain filling stations in Lagos offered gasoline to drivers for N200 per litre while there were still lines outside.

On Sunday, the Khalif filling station in Kubwa, Abuja, sold the product for N250 per litre, despite having N165 per litre advertised on its pumps. However, the amount will be computed based on N250/litre once the driver informs the fuel attendant of the quantity they desire to purchase.

Since February of this year, the lines for gasoline in Abuja have never stopped, but on Sunday, they got worse in the neighboring states of Nasarawa and Niger as drivers looked for PMS to travel during the Sallah break.

Oil merchants refuted accusations of product hoarding or diversion, pointing out that the main causes of the shortage were the NNPC’s inadequate supply of PMS and the failure to pay for bridging claims for the transportation of gasoline.

According to Billy Gillis-Harry, president of the Nigerian Association of Petroleum Products Retail Outlets, filling stations that had fuel to sell were operating while those that were closed were unable to do so.

He said, “The problem is that every side needs to be transparent. We, as retail outlet owners, are ready to sell petroleum products to the teeming Nigerian public. We have no reason why we should not sell our products.

“The money used in buying the 45,000 litres of petrol from depots, almost N7m, is borrowed, and time-bound. So every retail outlet owner knows that the wise thing to do in this business is to sell out and try to turn around that sale as many times as possible.

“So with this scenario in view, there is no retail outlet owner that is hoarding product or diverting it. Yes, we know there may be bad eggs among the good bunch, but the fact that we are not having sufficient products is what has remained the cause of fuel scarcity.”

Gillis- Harry added, “In the case of Abuja, it is clear to understand that if the bridging claims are paid to marketers, they will be able to continue their products’ purchase cycle. That is just the reality. So payment of bridging claims is an issue and insufficient supply is also another issue.

READ MORE: 2023 May Be Nigeria’s Costliest Elections Ever – Rewane

“This is because if there is product and there is money for us to buy, then why won’t we buy and sell? What else are we in business for? Are we going to buy products and keep them? The answer is no! So this is the reality.”

The president of PETROAN said that the necessity to scrap the current gasoline subsidy system was still the only thing that could resolve the issue in the downstream oil industry.

He said, “There is a solution, and it is simple. The subsidy that is being paid should be stopped. The money should be channeled to other developmental infrastructures such as health, education, etc.

“And since the refineries have not been fixed by the government, they should either give it wholly to private sector practitioners like PETROAN that own the retail outlets to manage.”

When questioned about the national oil company’s allegations of an inadequate supply of gasoline, the NNPC remained silent. Garba-Deen Mohammad, its spokesman, did not return calls and has not yet replied to a text message regarding the situation.

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