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FBI, Justice Department Dismantle Korean Hacking Group

According to Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, the FBI and Justice Department recently dismantled the operations of a hacking group that was supported by the North Korean government and that used ransomware to target American hospitals, ultimately recovering half a million dollars in ransom payments and cryptocurrency.

In a speech where she urged businesses affected by ransomware to notify law enforcement so that they can conduct an investigation and assist victim enterprises in their efforts to recover ransom payments, Monaco released new information about the attacks.

In this instance, according to Monaco, a Kansas hospital that paid a ransom after being the target of ransomware last year also informed the FBI, which tracked the payment and located money launderers operating out of China who helped the North Korean hackers cash out the illegal earnings. A total of $500,000, including the entire ransom payment from the hospital, was recovered by the FBI.

READ MORE: Joe Biden To Announce Executive Actions On Climate

Monaco remarked at the International Conference on Cyber Security, which was held at Fordham University, “If you report the attack, if you disclose the ransom demand and payment, if you work with the FBI, we can take action.” We can trace the money and recover it, help stop the next attack and the next victim, and punish fraudsters responsibly.

In 2021, U.S. authorities scrambled to deal with a wave of high-profile ransomware attacks, including one against an important fuel pipeline on the East Coast. In these attacks, hackers encrypt or lock up a victim’s data and demand exorbitant sums to release it. Even though the frequency of such widespread, front-page attacks appears to have decreased, smaller targets, like hospitals, are still being hit.

At the same conference, FBI Director Christopher Wray noted that one particular concern is that foreign nations eager for devastation are now using ransomware, which was formerly mostly used by common cybercriminals seeking to extort money.

In addition, ransomware perpetrators are now doing more than merely shutting down systems, according to Wray. “They’re stealing the data and threatening to leak your confidential information.”

Hospitals and public health organizations across the nation were specifically targeted by this ransomware version, known as “Maui.”

According to Justice Department authorities, hackers encrypted the medical center’s files and systems during the attack on the Kansas hospital—which they did not name—in May 2021. To get its data returned, the hospital spent roughly $100,000 in Bitcoin.

The agency reported that in addition to getting the money returned from the Kansas hospital, it also received money from a Colorado healthcare facility that had been hit by the same Maui ransomware version.

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According to Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, the FBI and Justice Department recently dismantled the operations of a hacking group that was supported by the North Korean government and that used ransomware to target American hospitals, ultimately recovering half a million dollars in ransom payments and cryptocurrency.

In a speech where she urged businesses affected by ransomware to notify law enforcement so that they can conduct an investigation and assist victim enterprises in their efforts to recover ransom payments, Monaco released new information about the attacks.

In this instance, according to Monaco, a Kansas hospital that paid a ransom after being the target of ransomware last year also informed the FBI, which tracked the payment and located money launderers operating out of China who helped the North Korean hackers cash out the illegal earnings. A total of $500,000, including the entire ransom payment from the hospital, was recovered by the FBI.

READ MORE: Joe Biden To Announce Executive Actions On Climate

Monaco remarked at the International Conference on Cyber Security, which was held at Fordham University, “If you report the attack, if you disclose the ransom demand and payment, if you work with the FBI, we can take action.” We can trace the money and recover it, help stop the next attack and the next victim, and punish fraudsters responsibly.

In 2021, U.S. authorities scrambled to deal with a wave of high-profile ransomware attacks, including one against an important fuel pipeline on the East Coast. In these attacks, hackers encrypt or lock up a victim’s data and demand exorbitant sums to release it. Even though the frequency of such widespread, front-page attacks appears to have decreased, smaller targets, like hospitals, are still being hit.

At the same conference, FBI Director Christopher Wray noted that one particular concern is that foreign nations eager for devastation are now using ransomware, which was formerly mostly used by common cybercriminals seeking to extort money.

In addition, ransomware perpetrators are now doing more than merely shutting down systems, according to Wray. “They’re stealing the data and threatening to leak your confidential information.”

Hospitals and public health organizations across the nation were specifically targeted by this ransomware version, known as “Maui.”

According to Justice Department authorities, hackers encrypted the medical center’s files and systems during the attack on the Kansas hospital—which they did not name—in May 2021. To get its data returned, the hospital spent roughly $100,000 in Bitcoin.

The agency reported that in addition to getting the money returned from the Kansas hospital, it also received money from a Colorado healthcare facility that had been hit by the same Maui ransomware version.

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