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CDC Examines 109 Cases Of Strange Hepatitis

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday that it is examining 109 cases of a strange form of hepatitis in children, including five deaths.

“Investigators from all around the world are working hard to figure out what’s causing this,” said Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious diseases.

Hospitalization was required in 90% of the cases, with 14% requiring liver transplantation. The majority of people healed completely.

Last Monday, the CDC issued a health alert warning doctors and public health officials to be on the lookout for similar occurrences, and investigators started looking into case histories dating back to October 1, 2021.

Adenovirus 41 was found in more than half of the cases, which is generally associated with gastroenteritis but not hepatitis in otherwise healthy youngsters.

READ MORE: Trauma Could Cause Stuttering, Speech Disorder – Specialists

“I would put that at the top of the list of viruses of interest because of the link to adenovirus,” Butler added.

“However, we don’t know if the adenovirus is causing the illnesses or if it’s an immunological response to this specific strain of adenovirus.”

Environmental factors, such as the presence of animals in the residence, are also being investigated, as well as whether other viruses, such as Covid, may have had a role.

Adenovirus instances could be on the rise again after Covid lockdowns halted the spread for a few years, or the adenovirus could have evolved into a fresh, more hazardous strain.

However, the CDC claims that Covid vaccines are not to blame.

Nine cases in Alabama were reviewed in-depth, all of which were children under the age of two, who were too young for Covid immunization.

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday that it is examining 109 cases of a strange form of hepatitis in children, including five deaths.

“Investigators from all around the world are working hard to figure out what’s causing this,” said Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious diseases.

Hospitalization was required in 90% of the cases, with 14% requiring liver transplantation. The majority of people healed completely.

Last Monday, the CDC issued a health alert warning doctors and public health officials to be on the lookout for similar occurrences, and investigators started looking into case histories dating back to October 1, 2021.

Adenovirus 41 was found in more than half of the cases, which is generally associated with gastroenteritis but not hepatitis in otherwise healthy youngsters.

READ MORE: Trauma Could Cause Stuttering, Speech Disorder – Specialists

“I would put that at the top of the list of viruses of interest because of the link to adenovirus,” Butler added.

“However, we don’t know if the adenovirus is causing the illnesses or if it’s an immunological response to this specific strain of adenovirus.”

Environmental factors, such as the presence of animals in the residence, are also being investigated, as well as whether other viruses, such as Covid, may have had a role.

Adenovirus instances could be on the rise again after Covid lockdowns halted the spread for a few years, or the adenovirus could have evolved into a fresh, more hazardous strain.

However, the CDC claims that Covid vaccines are not to blame.

Nine cases in Alabama were reviewed in-depth, all of which were children under the age of two, who were too young for Covid immunization.

JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER

Our newsletter gives you access to a curated selection of the most important stories daily.

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