Tuesday
August, 16

Attempts To End Hunger, Malnutrition Are Failing – WHO

According to the most recent State of Food Security and Nutrition Report, attempts to end hunger and malnutrition are failing.

According to a United Nations report, the number of people who are hungry worldwide increased to 828 million in 2021, an increase of about 46 million since 2020 and 150 million since the COVID-19 pandemic (1). This new data shows that the world is getting further away from its goal of eradicating hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition in all of its forms by 2030.

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI) report, published in 2022, provides updates on the state of global food security and nutrition, as well as the most recent estimates of the price and accessibility of a healthy diet. The research also considers how governments, cognizant of the limited public resources available in many regions of the world, may repurpose their current support for agriculture to lower the cost of nutritious diets.

The UN World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the World Health Organization(WHO) jointly released the study today.

According to the statistics, 828 million people – 46 million more than in 2020 and 150 million more than in 2019 – experienced hunger in 2021. After essentially staying the same since 2015, the percentage of the world’s population that experiences hunger increased in 2020 and continued to do so in 2021, reaching 9.8%. In contrast, those numbers for 2019 and 2020 are 8% and 9.3%, respectively.

In 2021, 2.3 billion people worldwide (29.3 percent) experienced moderate-to-severe food insecurity, an increase of 350 million from the year before the COVID-19 pandemic. A whopping 924 million people, or 11.7% of the world’s population, experienced acute food insecurity, an increase of 207 million in just two years. In 2021, the gender gap in food insecurity widened, with 31.9 percent of women and 27.6 percent of males in the world experiencing moderate-to-severe food insecurity, a difference of more than 4 percentage points from 20the 20s 3 percentage point difference.

In 2020, 3.1 billion individuals, an increase of 112 million from 2019, we’re unable to afford a nutritious diet due to rising consumer food prices brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and the containment measures that were implemented.

The worst form of malnutrition, wasting, which ups a child’s risk of death by up to 12 times, affects an estimated 45 million children under the age of five. A chronic shortage of vital nutrients in their diets also resulted in stunted growth and development among 149 million children under the age of five, and 39 million of them were overweight.

With over 44% of newborns under six months old being exclusively breastfed globally in 2020, there has been progressing in the area of exclusive breastfeeding. This still falls short of the goal of 50% by 2030. Two out of three kids are not given the minimally diversified diet they require to grow and develop to their full potential, which is extremely concerning.

Even if a worldwide economic recovery is taken into account, estimates show that about 670 million people (8 percent of the world’s population) will still be suffering from hunger in 2030. This number is comparable to that of 2015, when the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was introduced, to eradicate hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition by the end of this decade.

The ongoing conflict in Ukraine, which involves two of the largest global producers of grains, oilseeds, and fertilizer, is disrupting global supply chains and driving up the cost of grain, fertilizer, energy, as well as a therapeutic food that is ready to use for children who are severely malnourished. This comes at a time when supply chains are already being negatively impacted by more extreme weather events, particularly in low-income nations, and could have alarming repercussions for global food security and nutrition.

The heads of the five UN agencies (2) noted in this year’s Foreword, “This report frequently underscores the escalation of these primary drivers of food insecurity and malnutrition: conflict, climate extremes, and economic shocks, along with widening disparities. “The question at hand is not whether or whether adversities will continue to occur, but rather how we must act more courageously to create resilience against subsequent shocks.”

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Uchara Faith
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According to the most recent State of Food Security and Nutrition Report, attempts to end hunger and malnutrition are failing.

According to a United Nations report, the number of people who are hungry worldwide increased to 828 million in 2021, an increase of about 46 million since 2020 and 150 million since the COVID-19 pandemic (1). This new data shows that the world is getting further away from its goal of eradicating hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition in all of its forms by 2030.

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI) report, published in 2022, provides updates on the state of global food security and nutrition, as well as the most recent estimates of the price and accessibility of a healthy diet. The research also considers how governments, cognizant of the limited public resources available in many regions of the world, may repurpose their current support for agriculture to lower the cost of nutritious diets.

The UN World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the World Health Organization(WHO) jointly released the study today.

According to the statistics, 828 million people – 46 million more than in 2020 and 150 million more than in 2019 – experienced hunger in 2021. After essentially staying the same since 2015, the percentage of the world’s population that experiences hunger increased in 2020 and continued to do so in 2021, reaching 9.8%. In contrast, those numbers for 2019 and 2020 are 8% and 9.3%, respectively.

In 2021, 2.3 billion people worldwide (29.3 percent) experienced moderate-to-severe food insecurity, an increase of 350 million from the year before the COVID-19 pandemic. A whopping 924 million people, or 11.7% of the world’s population, experienced acute food insecurity, an increase of 207 million in just two years. In 2021, the gender gap in food insecurity widened, with 31.9 percent of women and 27.6 percent of males in the world experiencing moderate-to-severe food insecurity, a difference of more than 4 percentage points from 20the 20s 3 percentage point difference.

In 2020, 3.1 billion individuals, an increase of 112 million from 2019, we’re unable to afford a nutritious diet due to rising consumer food prices brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and the containment measures that were implemented.

The worst form of malnutrition, wasting, which ups a child’s risk of death by up to 12 times, affects an estimated 45 million children under the age of five. A chronic shortage of vital nutrients in their diets also resulted in stunted growth and development among 149 million children under the age of five, and 39 million of them were overweight.

With over 44% of newborns under six months old being exclusively breastfed globally in 2020, there has been progressing in the area of exclusive breastfeeding. This still falls short of the goal of 50% by 2030. Two out of three kids are not given the minimally diversified diet they require to grow and develop to their full potential, which is extremely concerning.

Even if a worldwide economic recovery is taken into account, estimates show that about 670 million people (8 percent of the world’s population) will still be suffering from hunger in 2030. This number is comparable to that of 2015, when the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was introduced, to eradicate hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition by the end of this decade.

The ongoing conflict in Ukraine, which involves two of the largest global producers of grains, oilseeds, and fertilizer, is disrupting global supply chains and driving up the cost of grain, fertilizer, energy, as well as a therapeutic food that is ready to use for children who are severely malnourished. This comes at a time when supply chains are already being negatively impacted by more extreme weather events, particularly in low-income nations, and could have alarming repercussions for global food security and nutrition.

The heads of the five UN agencies (2) noted in this year’s Foreword, “This report frequently underscores the escalation of these primary drivers of food insecurity and malnutrition: conflict, climate extremes, and economic shocks, along with widening disparities. “The question at hand is not whether or whether adversities will continue to occur, but rather how we must act more courageously to create resilience against subsequent shocks.”

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