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Saturday, May 21, 2022

Ancient Healthy African Beauty Rituals

Beauty is worse than wine, according to Aldous Huxley, because it intoxicates both the possessor and the beholder.

Various cultures around the world had beauty routines for skincare and haircare long before companies began to make cosmetics. Natural resources containing natural active components for nourishing and healthy skin were predominantly utilized.

The following are only a few of the many ancient beauty practices that may have made their way into modern-day beauty:

The first ancient ritual is exfoliation. Exfoliation has been practiced for thousands of years, with the ancient Egyptians being the first to do so. Dry brushing was a popular exfoliation treatment in this area; it was thought that dry brushing enhances healthy circulation and exfoliates dead cells. This method unclogged pores and gave the skin a healthy glow. Cleopatra also used Dead Sea Salt as a key exfoliator in her bath.

READ MORE: How To Look Healthy And Exotic In Clothes

The steam bath is the next ancient beauty practice. The Hammam Bath, also known as the Turkish Steam Bath, is an ancient beauty practice used by women in Northern Africa to purify their bodies. This bath ritual includes a lot of argan oil. The steam bath, when used in conjunction with argan oil, aids in moisturizing the skin and preserving its natural elasticity. Beldi soap, a body mask mixture that is used all over the skin, is made with Argan extracts.

Face masks are a centuries-old beautifying routine. Face masks are extremely popular in Zimbabwe and Ethiopia. Okra face masks are popular in Zimbabwe; the Okra is boiled till soft, then mashed and applied to the face for 5–7 minutes before washing off. The face mask leaves the skin moisturized and soft due to the high amount of nutritional components, such as antioxidants and vitamins found in Okra.

Qasil leaf powder is used as an exfoliating face mask in Ethiopia; it hydrates the skin and helps to improve skin tone. Hair dandruff can also be treated with Qasil powder.

We just cannot overlook the African Black Soap. African black soap has its origins in Western and Central Africa. African women have been using black soap for years, which is produced from dried cocoa pod leaves, a few drops of coconut oil, palm oil, and Shea butter. It’s a natural moisturizer that also serves as a UV shield. The African black soap works wonders on the skin, making it look healthy and radiant.

Finally, there’s the smoke bath. This is known as Sudanese Dukhan and is usually reserved for the bride-to-be. Despite this, many other people have chosen this beauty regimen over the years because of the lovely effects it produces. This rite entailed the bride sitting in an acacia wood smoke bath without bathing twice a week before the wedding. This bath creates a coating on the skin that peels off on the last day, leaving the skin glowing and radiant.

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Beauty is worse than wine, according to Aldous Huxley, because it intoxicates both the possessor and the beholder.

Various cultures around the world had beauty routines for skincare and haircare long before companies began to make cosmetics. Natural resources containing natural active components for nourishing and healthy skin were predominantly utilized.

The following are only a few of the many ancient beauty practices that may have made their way into modern-day beauty:

The first ancient ritual is exfoliation. Exfoliation has been practiced for thousands of years, with the ancient Egyptians being the first to do so. Dry brushing was a popular exfoliation treatment in this area; it was thought that dry brushing enhances healthy circulation and exfoliates dead cells. This method unclogged pores and gave the skin a healthy glow. Cleopatra also used Dead Sea Salt as a key exfoliator in her bath.

READ MORE: How To Look Healthy And Exotic In Clothes

The steam bath is the next ancient beauty practice. The Hammam Bath, also known as the Turkish Steam Bath, is an ancient beauty practice used by women in Northern Africa to purify their bodies. This bath ritual includes a lot of argan oil. The steam bath, when used in conjunction with argan oil, aids in moisturizing the skin and preserving its natural elasticity. Beldi soap, a body mask mixture that is used all over the skin, is made with Argan extracts.

Face masks are a centuries-old beautifying routine. Face masks are extremely popular in Zimbabwe and Ethiopia. Okra face masks are popular in Zimbabwe; the Okra is boiled till soft, then mashed and applied to the face for 5–7 minutes before washing off. The face mask leaves the skin moisturized and soft due to the high amount of nutritional components, such as antioxidants and vitamins found in Okra.

Qasil leaf powder is used as an exfoliating face mask in Ethiopia; it hydrates the skin and helps to improve skin tone. Hair dandruff can also be treated with Qasil powder.

We just cannot overlook the African Black Soap. African black soap has its origins in Western and Central Africa. African women have been using black soap for years, which is produced from dried cocoa pod leaves, a few drops of coconut oil, palm oil, and Shea butter. It’s a natural moisturizer that also serves as a UV shield. The African black soap works wonders on the skin, making it look healthy and radiant.

Finally, there’s the smoke bath. This is known as Sudanese Dukhan and is usually reserved for the bride-to-be. Despite this, many other people have chosen this beauty regimen over the years because of the lovely effects it produces. This rite entailed the bride sitting in an acacia wood smoke bath without bathing twice a week before the wedding. This bath creates a coating on the skin that peels off on the last day, leaving the skin glowing and radiant.

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Our newsletter gives you access to a curated selection of the most important stories daily.

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