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Alleged Executions: Sudan To Recall Ambassador To Ethiopia

Following allegations that the Ethiopian army murdered seven detained Sudanese troops and a civilian, Sudan announced Monday that it will withdraw its ambassador to Addis Abeba for “consultations.”

“In an act that contravenes all laws and customs of war and international humanitarian law, the Ethiopian army executed seven Sudanese soldiers and a citizen who were their captives,” the Sudanese armed forces said late Sunday.

The army said “this treacherous act will not pass,” vowing to respond to “this cowardly behavior.”

In recent years, tensions have increased over the Al-Fashaqa border area, which is adjacent to Ethiopia’s unstable Tigray region, sporadically resulting in armed conflicts.

No answer was given right away by Ethiopia.

According to a Sudanese military official who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity, the troops were abducted from a border area near the Al-Fashaqa region.

READ MORE: President Al-Sisi To Visit Bahrain Tuesday

The Sudanese foreign ministry declared on Monday that it would lodge a complaint with the UN Security Council and “immediately recall its ambassador to Ethiopia for consultations.”

“The Ethiopian ambassador to Khartoum will also be summoned to inform him of Sudan’s condemnation of this inhumane behavior,” the ministry said.

Al-Fashaqa, a fertile area long farmed by Ethiopian farmers but claimed by Sudan, has strained relations between Khartoum and Addis Abeba and led to intermittent violent conflicts between the Sudanese and Ethiopian sides.

After fighting broke out in Tigray in November 2020 and thousands of refugees fled into Sudan, tensions increased.

Since then, Khartoum and Addis Abeba have been engaged in a violent verbal battle, exchanging charges of violence and territorial aggression.

Further tensions in the area, such as those surrounding Ethiopia’s contentious Blue Nile dam, are fueled by the boundary issue.

The Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam has been opposed by Sudan and Egypt, two downstream nations, which have pressed for a deal on the reservoir’s filling and the dam’s operation.

Khartoum and Cairo criticized Addis Abeba in February for deciding to begin power production at the dam unilaterally.

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Following allegations that the Ethiopian army murdered seven detained Sudanese troops and a civilian, Sudan announced Monday that it will withdraw its ambassador to Addis Abeba for “consultations.”

“In an act that contravenes all laws and customs of war and international humanitarian law, the Ethiopian army executed seven Sudanese soldiers and a citizen who were their captives,” the Sudanese armed forces said late Sunday.

The army said “this treacherous act will not pass,” vowing to respond to “this cowardly behavior.”

In recent years, tensions have increased over the Al-Fashaqa border area, which is adjacent to Ethiopia’s unstable Tigray region, sporadically resulting in armed conflicts.

No answer was given right away by Ethiopia.

According to a Sudanese military official who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity, the troops were abducted from a border area near the Al-Fashaqa region.

READ MORE: President Al-Sisi To Visit Bahrain Tuesday

The Sudanese foreign ministry declared on Monday that it would lodge a complaint with the UN Security Council and “immediately recall its ambassador to Ethiopia for consultations.”

“The Ethiopian ambassador to Khartoum will also be summoned to inform him of Sudan’s condemnation of this inhumane behavior,” the ministry said.

Al-Fashaqa, a fertile area long farmed by Ethiopian farmers but claimed by Sudan, has strained relations between Khartoum and Addis Abeba and led to intermittent violent conflicts between the Sudanese and Ethiopian sides.

After fighting broke out in Tigray in November 2020 and thousands of refugees fled into Sudan, tensions increased.

Since then, Khartoum and Addis Abeba have been engaged in a violent verbal battle, exchanging charges of violence and territorial aggression.

Further tensions in the area, such as those surrounding Ethiopia’s contentious Blue Nile dam, are fueled by the boundary issue.

The Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam has been opposed by Sudan and Egypt, two downstream nations, which have pressed for a deal on the reservoir’s filling and the dam’s operation.

Khartoum and Cairo criticized Addis Abeba in February for deciding to begin power production at the dam unilaterally.

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