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Al-Burhan Deploys Troops Ahead Of Pro-Democracy Protests

In advance of the massive demonstrations that pro-democracy organizations planned against coup leader General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, Sudanese police and soldiers deployed in significant numbers throughout the nation’s capital Khartoum on Sunday.

According to AFP correspondents, security troops have set up road barriers on Nile river crossings that connect Khartoum to its suburbs.

Despite a time of relative calm during the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha, which concluded early last week, demonstrators threatened to return to the streets in huge numbers.

The protesters reject Burhan’s attempt to seize power in October and draw attention to fierce warfare in the Blue Nile state, in southern Sudan, which is located approximately 450 kilometers (280 miles) from Khartoum.

Following Sudan’s most recent coup, which halted the country’s transition to civilian rule, there have been almost weekly rallies and security force crackdowns that have resulted in at least 114 deaths, according to pro-democracy doctors.

On June 30, nine people died, according to the medical professionals, and their deaths rekindled the movement.

READ MORE: Khashoggi: What Biden, Crown Prince Discussed – Saudi Official

In an unexpected step on July 4, Burhan promised to clear the way for a civilian administration.

The nation’s largest civic umbrella organization, however, denounced the action as a “ruse.” The army leader is still under pressure to quit from protesters.

They charge that the current military leadership and the ex-rebel commanders who agreed to a 2020 peace accord exacerbated ethnic tensions for their own benefit.

According to the health ministry, at least 33 people were murdered and over 100 were injured in fighting between competing ethnic groups on Sunday in Blue Nile, according to witnesses.

During Sudan’s civil war, which lasted from 1983 to 2005, guerrillas in Blue Nile fought against the former authoritarian president Omar Al-Bashir. They started using firearms once more in 2011.

In 2019, Bashir was dismissed. The transitional government came to a peace agreement with significant rebel factions the next year, including those from the war-torn western Darfur area and the Blue Nile.

The Berti and the Hausa are the two native factions engaged in the present fighting in Blue Nile.

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Adoga Stephen
Adoga Stephen is a trained journalist, researcher, creative writer and freelancer. He studied Mass Communication at the Lagos State University of Science and Technology (then Laspotech) and acquired requisite skills for the practice of journalism, a profession he has been practicing since 2016.

In advance of the massive demonstrations that pro-democracy organizations planned against coup leader General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, Sudanese police and soldiers deployed in significant numbers throughout the nation’s capital Khartoum on Sunday.

According to AFP correspondents, security troops have set up road barriers on Nile river crossings that connect Khartoum to its suburbs.

Despite a time of relative calm during the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha, which concluded early last week, demonstrators threatened to return to the streets in huge numbers.

The protesters reject Burhan’s attempt to seize power in October and draw attention to fierce warfare in the Blue Nile state, in southern Sudan, which is located approximately 450 kilometers (280 miles) from Khartoum.

Following Sudan’s most recent coup, which halted the country’s transition to civilian rule, there have been almost weekly rallies and security force crackdowns that have resulted in at least 114 deaths, according to pro-democracy doctors.

On June 30, nine people died, according to the medical professionals, and their deaths rekindled the movement.

READ MORE: Khashoggi: What Biden, Crown Prince Discussed – Saudi Official

In an unexpected step on July 4, Burhan promised to clear the way for a civilian administration.

The nation’s largest civic umbrella organization, however, denounced the action as a “ruse.” The army leader is still under pressure to quit from protesters.

They charge that the current military leadership and the ex-rebel commanders who agreed to a 2020 peace accord exacerbated ethnic tensions for their own benefit.

According to the health ministry, at least 33 people were murdered and over 100 were injured in fighting between competing ethnic groups on Sunday in Blue Nile, according to witnesses.

During Sudan’s civil war, which lasted from 1983 to 2005, guerrillas in Blue Nile fought against the former authoritarian president Omar Al-Bashir. They started using firearms once more in 2011.

In 2019, Bashir was dismissed. The transitional government came to a peace agreement with significant rebel factions the next year, including those from the war-torn western Darfur area and the Blue Nile.

The Berti and the Hausa are the two native factions engaged in the present fighting in Blue Nile.

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